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  • Bankruptcy and Insolvency Records
    Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada
     
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  • Managing Risk in Uncertain Times

    The Role of the Credit Professional in the Commercial Leasing Industry by Lisa Moore CCP

    December 15, 2009: civil servants in Ireland rally in reaction to the Irish government's vote in favour of a reduction in public sector compensation by 5-15%. The Republic of Ireland is claimed to be facing the deepest financial crisis of any advanced nation and it isn't over yet.

    May 5, 2010: striking protestors in Greece, the undisputed pillar of ancient democratic civilization, jam the streets setting the finance ministry ablaze, killing three.

     
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  • CCAA proceedings now at your fingertips

    Trustees, creditors, academics, policy makers and government officials have a new source of insolvency information available to them thanks to recent changes to the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (CCAA). One result of the changes, which came into effect September 18, 2009, is that the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy (OSB) became responsible for maintaining both a Registry of Public Records and a Repository of CCAA Files.

    Registry of Public Records
    Once a court grants protection to a debtor company under the CCAA, the monitor (trustee) must send basic information to the OSB within one business day. This information includes the court’s file number and coordinates—including the website address of both the debtor and the monitor.

     
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  • BANKRUPTCY FRAUD WARNING SIGNS - A CHECKLIST

    Use the following list to identify signs of bankruptcy fraud.

    • Failure to keep commonly used business records; incomplete or missing business records
    • Unusual depletion of assets shortly before bankruptcy filing
    • Assets are concealed
    • ...
     
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  • Predictive Indicators - Learn how to read the signs and improve your bottom line

    Managing your company’s exposure to risk has become a challenging task. There is more pressure to speed up the credit review process and more responsibility resting on your shoulders to be accountable for your decisions and improve company profitability.

     
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  • Identity Theft - Practical tips for credit professionals

    Every year, identity theft results in millions of dollars of reported losses for Canadians. This has serious implications for credit professionals when it comes to the collection, protection, usage and disposal of the information they gather on their customers. Whether your company accepts payment by credit card, by wire transfer, via e-commerce or by the ageless paper-based cheque method, you need to ensure that your department plays its part in having the necessary checks and balances in place.

     
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  • Overview of Proposed PIPEDA Amendments

    On May 25, 2010, the Minister of Industry tabled amendments to the federal private sector privacy legislation, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA). PIPEDA was introduced in 2001 and has been applicable to many private sector enterprises since 2004.

     
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  • Court Declines to Approve Sale of Assets as Part of Proposal Proceedings

    In the decision of Justice Cumming In the Matter of the Proposal of Hypnotic Clubs Inc. (“Hypnotic” or the “Debtor”) the court dismissed a motion by the Debtor for a sale of its assets pursuant to s.65.13 of the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (“BIA”).

     
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  • The Interprovincial Enforcement of Judgments

    A Creditor and a Debtor enter into a financial agreement in Alberta. After several years, the Debtor moves to Manitoba, leaving behind only sparse assets, (not nearly enough to cover the costs owed) in Alberta. Following a slowdown of repayments, the Creditor decides to take legal action against the Debtor in the Alberta Court of the Queen’s Bench.

     
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  • CRA Trust Overrides Contractual Right To Set Off

    In a recent decision involving the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and the Caisse populaire du bon Conseil (Caisse), the Supreme Court of Canada, (SCC) considered whether a lender’s contractual rights in respect of its customer’s term deposit account could be overridden by a deemed statutory trust in favor of the Crown.

    The issue was whether the Caisse, by virtue of its contractual arrangement with its customer, Camvrac Enterprises Inc, held an iron clad security interest over the proceeds of its deposit account that could not be overruled.

     
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  • Supreme Court Rules Crown Doesn’t Have Rights To GST And QST

    In a unanimous decision on October 30, 2009 relating to the Goods and Services Tax (“GST”) and the Quebec Sales Tax (“QST”), the Supreme Court of Canada rejected the most recent attempt of the Crown to secure its position by recovering the tax portion of accounts receivable outstanding at the time of bankruptcy where the bankrupt had not made the required remittances.

     
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  • PPSA & Legislative Q's
     
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  • International Financial Reporting Standards

    Effective January 1, 2011, IFRS will replace current Canadian GAAP accounting standards for Canadian publicly accountable enterprises (PAE) and Government Business Enterprises. As of this date as well, private companies have the option of adopting IFRS or the new Canadian standards developed specifically to meet their users' needs which are referred to as the Accounting Standards for Private Enterprises.

     
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  • All About Choice

    Experience has told us that when the economy turns bad, it’s time to expect more accounting shenanigans from public companies. This can happen in three ways.

    Sometimes, a company has been using aggressive accounting for years, and a dismal economic picture makes it difficult to hide the old chicanery any further. Other times, a firm decides to use accounting tricks to mitigate the impact of poor operating results.

     
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  • Role of the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy (OSB)

    The Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy (OSB) is part of Industry Canada. Their role is to ensure public confidence in the market place by protecting the integrity of the bankruptcy and insolvency system.

     
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  • Search Sites for Bankruptcies in Canada and the US

    In Canada, you can check on the Superintendent of Bankruptcy search site, or in the US, by looking for a filing on PACER, (Public Access Court Electronic Records.) You will have to establish an account on PACER, but the fees are ...

     
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  • The Ultimate Skip List

    Valerie McGilvrey is a US Professional Skip Tracer who has agreed to share this list with the members of the Credit Institute of Canada. Much of the information is US related, but can be adapted for Canada.

     
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  • PIPEDA and Collections

    Often, collection activity requires interacting with personal information about a consumer, in order to research, contact or collect from that consumer. Whether you are in an internal receivables department, third party collection agency, or you are a legal agent...

     
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  • Risk Assessment

    Risk assessment is a step in a risk management procedure. Risk assessment is the determination of quantitative or qualitative value of risk related to a concrete situation and a recognized threat (also called hazard). Quantitative risk assessment requires calculations of two components of risk (R):, the magnitude of the potential loss (L), and the probability (p) that the loss will occur.

     
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  • Letters of Credit

    A letter of credit is a document that a financial institution or similar party issues to a seller of goods or services which provides that the issuer will pay the seller for goods or services the seller delivers to a third-party buyer. The seller then seeks reimbursement from...

     
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  • Construction Credit

    Construction credit is a unique and specialized form of mercantile credit. Although the field follows many of the same principles, practices and procedures as mercantile credit, there are a number of factors that make the practice unique. In order to be successful, the credit professional must...

     
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  • Terms used by CPA's

    A CPA will competently assist an organization (whether it is a privately held business, a publicly owned corporation, or a nonprofit organization) with preparing reports on its financial performance. Such reports help owners and managers make operational decisions, enable creditors to evaluate loan applications, and provide individuals with information to make investment decisions.

     
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  • Introduction to Corporate Governance

    Why is governance important from a credit risk perspective? Jeremy Brisset, corporate lawyer at Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt will tell you at our next Live Webinar. This webinar will be of value to members of the credit sector, particularly those in commercial credit industry.

     
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  • My Customer is Restructuring, in Receivership or Bankrupt – What Now?
    Presented by Jerry Henechowicz, CA-CAIRP, Trustee in Bankruptcy Jerry HenechowiczThis one hour webinar with one of Canada’s leading restructuring and insolvency firms to get updates on the best practices and latest trends in maximizing recoveries when a customer is restructuring, in receivership or bankrupt.
     
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  • Lifting or Piercing The Corporate Veil
    If you always thought that incorporation generally protects shareholders and directors from personal liability when things go wrong, then this webinar is for you. Our webinar leader is Andrew Hladyshevsky, QC, LLB and a partner with the law firm, Fraser Milner Casgrain
     
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  • How Creditors Can Stay Informed

    Knowledge Is Power: As a creditor, you need to learn quickly and easily about public legal notices. NoticeConnect brings that information to your fingertips! They are a web platform for publishing and accessing legal notices and has been operating since 2014. The platform is trusted by lawyers, trustees, banks, and government.

     
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  • Already pinched, many Canadians anxious about higher rates
     
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  • These Best Credit Practices in Brazil Will Keep You from Falling Downhill
    I’m often asked by many overseas creditors about where to start when establishing a business relationship with a customer in Brazil. My answer is that it often depends on whether you are going to grant credit, and if so, how much.
     
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  • Legal insights on minimizing exposure to bad debt and maximizing recovery efforts

    In this webinar you will learn: What information should you gather from new customers?, The importance of documenting, How can you identify opportunities for recovery?, and What remedies might the law offer?

     
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Q and A (2)
  • We see more and more public companies partially or completely reorganizing as Income Trusts. What are the advantages and disadvantages to the company and what could the ramifications be to trade creditors? Is there anything we should be questioning or looking for in this type of transaction?
    https://creditedu.org/knowledgecentre/index.php/site/qa/4

    An income trust (the "Trust") is essentially an investment vehicle which a corporation (the "Corporation") can establish in order to divert and distribute its revenues in a generally more tax efficient manner to the investors of the Trust.

    While the pros and cons of establishing an income trust are largely tax driven, extremely complex and beyond the scope of this forum, income trusts basically operate by taking the monies raised by the Trust from its investors and loaning them to the Corporation. Such loan can either be on a secured or an unsecured basis. Revenues from the Corporation's operations are then paid to the Trust in order to service the loan with those monies then being available for distribution to the Trust's investors.

    The typical structure sees virtually all of the Corporation's distributable income paid out without corporate tax because the income is being used to service the Corporation's debt (e.g., the loan from the Trust). If the investors of the Trust are tax-exempt entities such as RRSPs or pension funds, payments to them from the Trust will be received on a more favourable tax basis than if the monies were distributed as dividends.

    While the establishment of the Trust will not alter the manner in which the Corporation carries on its business (note that the Trust does not carry on business - it is simply an investment vehicle), the difference is that with the establishment of the Trust, the Corporation has a new and typically large creditor (being the Trust) whose debt must be serviced by the Corporation.

    From the perspective of companies doing business with the Corporation and extending credit to the Corporation, while the creation of the Trust in and of itself will not negatively impact upon the Corporation's ability to carry on its business, companies doing business with the Corporation may be at a greater risk should the Corporation subsequently run into financial difficulties. Aside from the Corporation having less flexibility to refinance since cash flow will be committed to debt service on the monies owing to the Trust (and other lenders), the Trust represents a new creditor which did not previously exist. If the Trust's loan to the Corporation is made on a secured basis, the Trust will be entitled to recover its monies prior to all of the Corporation's unsecured creditors, thereby diminishing the pool of funds available to the unsecured creditors. Similarly, secured creditors are at risk to the extent that the Trust's security has priority over their security. If the Trust's loan to the Corporation is made on an unsecured basis, the Trust will be another unsecured creditor sharing in the monies available to the unsecured creditors, meaning less monies will be available for the unsecured creditors had the Trust not been created.

  • How does theoretical economics affect credit decisions?
    https://creditedu.org/knowledgecentre/index.php/site/qa/12
    1. As we have seen in the recessions of 1991 and 2001, marginal companies in many sectors will be forced to file for protection because of liquidity problems caused by them failing to meet their financing covenants, or the bank not renewing their line of credit, or credit becoming more expensive.  A failure of a major buyer can cause a company to break its covenants and be outside of its margining limit.
    2. With publicly traded companies, the problems may occur, but at least there is disclosure required if public companies are not meeting forecasts or they are outside of their banking covenants or they are having difficulty renewing their lines of credit.  Furthermore, often the debt of these companies is rated and the company’s fortunes are followed by industry analysts.

    By the time a credit manager gets the information, the company may already have a large exposure to the buyer.  As the situation deteriorates it may be difficult to bring the exposure down.  It is a question of timing, the poor results may not be reported for several months and during that period the exposure has been continuing to run.  The time between the disclosure of the problem and the reorganization may be very short as the buyer and secured creditors want to protect the assets.

    1. With private companies the problem is exacerbated, as it is difficult to even obtain financial information, let alone be advised in advance of developing problems.  Suppliers don’t know if sales are down, margins are being squeezed or there are problems with the bank.  If a credit manager can obtain Financial Statements, they provide a historical picture at best.  The effect of the recession is happening in real time, out of sight.

    In summary, credit managers work with very imperfect information.  Time works against them in obtaining information and they have to often make credit decisions projecting 3 to 6 months ahead.  A recession in the U.S. affects many buyers, but in most cases, the credit manager can only guess at how much the buyer is impacted.

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