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  • BANKRUPTCY FRAUD WARNING SIGNS - A CHECKLIST

    Use the following list to identify signs of bankruptcy fraud.

    • Failure to keep commonly used business records; incomplete or missing business records
    • Unusual depletion of assets shortly before bankruptcy filing
    • Assets are concealed
    • ...
     
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  • Suing a Foreigner? Keep Control of the Case with a Forum Selection Clause

    In the world of cross-border litigation, I can tell you that prevention is worth much more than a pound of cure. Battles over where a case is to be litigated are common, and can be so protracted and costly that the parties never reach a determination of the merits of the case. Such battles are common because generally there are tremendous strategic advantages to litigating the case in one’s home jurisdiction, and disadvantages to litigating the case in one's opponent's jurisdiction.

     
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  • PPSA & Legislative Q's
     
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  • Credit application Terms

    Here is a list of items that are commonly included in B2B credit applications.

     
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  • International Credit

    Foreign trade differs from domestic trade with respect to the instruments and documents employed. Most domestic sales involve an open-account credit where the customer is billed and has so many days to pay. In international trade, the seller is seldom able to obtain as accurate or as thorough credit information on the potential buyer as with a domestic sale.

     
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  • Risk Assessment

    Risk assessment is a step in a risk management procedure. Risk assessment is the determination of quantitative or qualitative value of risk related to a concrete situation and a recognized threat (also called hazard). Quantitative risk assessment requires calculations of two components of risk (R):, the magnitude of the potential loss (L), and the probability (p) that the loss will occur.

     
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  • Credit Risk Management

    Credit risk is defined as the likelihood of loss resulting from a customer's failure to pay for the goods delivered. It is the responsibility a Credit Manager to verify that all customer files are complete and contain all the necessary information to protect the accounts receivable.

     
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  • Collection and Dispute Management

    The objectives of the Collection team are to:

    • Facilitate a seamless processing of Sales orders within a specific risk guideline defined by the Credit and Collection department
    • Liaise with the Sales department and the credit department to anticipate any future discrepancy between the Sales plan and the maximum risk exposure
    • ...
     
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  • Letters of Credit

    A letter of credit is a document that a financial institution or similar party issues to a seller of goods or services which provides that the issuer will pay the seller for goods or services the seller delivers to a third-party buyer. The seller then seeks reimbursement from...

     
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  • Floor Plans

    Go to any large auto dealer and there are hundreds of cars on the lot. You may wonder how much the dealer had to spend to provide you with almost limitless choices. What you don't realize is that, like most new car dealers, a floor plan was used to the cars. Simply, it is a way for...

     
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  • Construction Credit

    Construction credit is a unique and specialized form of mercantile credit. Although the field follows many of the same principles, practices and procedures as mercantile credit, there are a number of factors that make the practice unique. In order to be successful, the credit professional must...

     
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  • Leasing and Rentals

    Merchantile Credit Managers are well trained to deal with how to manage the credit and collections of the transactions of selling of a product or services from one business to another.  However, the Leasing or Rentaling of a facility or a piece of equipment deserves special  consideration.

     
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  • Acceleration Clauses in the Event of Default – Are they enforceable?

    All leases have an acceleration clause when there is a default, however there is not a consistent approach as to what the damages will be. Some leases require the defaulted lessee to pay the balance of payments due without discount while others utilize a net present value formula applying a discount rate close to, but generally below, the interest rate implied in the lease. A few still use “the rule of 78’s” (but few under 50 know what that means). The recent case, Hav-A-Kar Leasing Ltd. v. Vekselshtein 2012 ONCA 826 (“Hav-A-Kar”) discussed this matter but may have not quite got it right.

     
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  • Contract Law & Collections

    This live webinar will give credit managers a brief overview of liens and how to achieve successful results. This presentation will cover: • How to be successful in your collection • How to avoid disputes and unnecessary costs • How to recognize the importance of solid contracts and record keeping

     
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  • Direct payments and construction insolvency
    Main contractor Carillion’s entry into liquidation has resulted in many employers seeking to establish relationships with subcontractors, under which they will be paid directly in order to stay on site and finish the relevant project. On the face of it, this seems like an attractive solution, and may leave some employers wondering why they didn’t procure their projects by construction management in the first place. However, establishing direct relations is not without risks, and requires safeguards for employers and subcontractors alike. Those are set out in the last section of this article, but it is important to understand the pitfalls, particularly of direct payment, first.
     
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  • These Best Credit Practices in Brazil Will Keep You from Falling Downhill
    I’m often asked by many overseas creditors about where to start when establishing a business relationship with a customer in Brazil. My answer is that it often depends on whether you are going to grant credit, and if so, how much.
     
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Q and A (1)
  • What can creditors do to protect themselves when a customer remits a cheque, for less than the full amount owing, and marks it "Paid in Full" or words to that effect? Also, what can a creditor do to protect themselves in this situation when their company uses a "lock box" or "shared service" center and the A/R personnel may not even see the cheque prior to it being negotiated? Is the law that governs these scenarios Federal or Provincial?
    https://creditedu.org/knowledgecentre/index.php/site/qa/3

    Courts are very familiar with this tactic and will generally not give effect to it. A cheque marked “paid in full” may very well be evidence of an agreement to reduce the debt owing, but it is easily rebuttable by clear evidence that the creditor accepted the payment only as partial payment. This is based at least partially on the concept of consideration. Put simply, this concept involves the idea that you do not get something for nothing. What the debtor is attempting to do in this situation is to receive a discount on its debt without providing any real benefit to the creditor in return. The courts will not allow a debtor to unilaterally alter its agreement with its creditor - which is what it is attempting to do with the notation on the cheque.

    One possible method of dealing with such attempts would be regularly forwarding statements thanking the debtors for any payments received and indicating the account balance to date. If the debtor then challenges the statement arguing that payment had been made in full by way of the cheque in question, all the creditor would have to do would be to respond by saying it was received in partial payment. Unless the debtor is able to produce some sort of an agreement with the creditor showing the creditor’s agreement to accept the reduced amount in full satisfaction for the amount owing, it is extremely unlikely that the courts find in favour of the debtor.

    Of course, if the creditor notices the notation before it deposits the cheque, it can also send a specific letter to the debtor thanking it for the payment and saying that the payment has been applied against the amount owing, that the creditor did not agree to accept the payment in full satisfaction of the amount owing and that the balance remains owing by the debtor.

    The law governing these scenarios is the common law of contract, which is a matter within the jurisdiction of the provinces. As such, the law as interpreted in one province may not necessarily be applied in another. However, frequently the courts in one province will consider and often follow the decisions of courts in other provinces.

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